post-title portfolio-title Afatinib Dimaleate Film-coated Tablets IP 20mg, 30mg, 40mg, 50mg Taj Pharma 2020-03-06 10:17:51 no no

Afatinib Dimaleate Film-coated Tablets IP 20mg, 30mg, 40mg, 50mg Taj Pharma

Afatinib Dimaleate Film-coated Tablets IP 20mg, 30mg, 40mg, 50mg Taj Pharma

Overview

INTRODUCTION

Afatinib 40mg Tablet is used in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. It is used in the treatment of adult patients who have certain mutations epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR).

Afatinib 40mg Tablet should be taken on an empty stomach, but try to have it at the same time every day to get the most benefits. Your doctor will decide what dose is necessary and how often you need to take it. This will depend on what you are being treated for and may change from time to time. You should take it exactly as your doctor has advised. Taking it in the wrong way or taking too much can cause very serious side effects. It may take several weeks or months for you to see or feel the benefits but do not stop taking it unless your doctor tells you to.

The most common side effects of this medicine include diarrhea, rash, dry skin, and nausea. Diarrhea can be serious sometimes so take medicine to treat it as prescribed by the doctor or stay hydrated. Your doctor may advice for some blood tests while you are taking this medicine.? It may also make your skin sensitive to the sun, so use sunscreen and wear protective clothing if you have to be in sunlight. Inform your doctor if you notice pain or redness or dry eye.

Before taking it, tell your doctor if have a breathing problem, liver, or kidney problems or are taking any medicines to treat infections. Many other medicines can affect, or be affected by, this medicine so let your healthcare team know all medications you are using. This medicine is not recommended during pregnancy or while breastfeeding. The use of effective contraception by females during treatment is important to avoid pregnancy.

USES OF AFATINIB TABLET

  • Non-small cell lung cancer

SIDE EFFECTS OF AFATINIB TABLET

Common

  • Diarrhea
  • Rash
  • Dry skin
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Loss of appetite
  • Itching
  • Stomatitis (Inflammation of the mouth)
  • Nail disorder

HOW TO USE AFATINIB TABLET

Take this medicine in the dose and duration as advised by your doctor. Swallow it as a whole. Do not chew, crush or break it. Afatinib 40mg Tablet is to be taken empty stomach.

HOW AFATINIB TABLET WORKS

Afatinib 40mg Tablet is an anti-cancer medication. It works by binding and inhibiting the enzyme receptors (EGFR, HER2, and HER4) that are responsible for the growth of cancer cells. Hence, resulting in the downregulation of signaling pathways. This is how it to stop or slow the spread of cancer.

SAFETY ADVICE

warningsAlcohol

SAFE

Consuming alcohol with Afatinib 40mg Tablet does not cause any harmful side effects.

warningsPregnancy

CONSULT YOUR DOCTOR

Afatinib 40mg Tablet is unsafe to use during pregnancy as there is definite evidence of risk to the developing baby. However, the doctor may rarely prescribe it in some life-threatening situations if the benefits are more than the potential risks. Please consult your doctor.

warningsBreastfeeding

CONSULT YOUR DOCTOR

Afatinib 40mg Tablet is probably unsafe to use during breastfeeding. Limited human data suggests that the drug may pass into the breastmilk and harm the baby.

warningsDriving

CONSULT YOUR DOCTOR

It is not known whether Afatinib 40mg Tablet alters the ability to drive. Do not drive if you experience any symptoms that affect your ability to concentrate and react.

warningsKidney

SAFE IF PRESCRIBED

Afatinib 40mg Tablet is probably safe to use in patients with kidney disease. Limited data available suggests that dose adjustment of Afatinib 40mg Tablet may not be needed in these patients. Please consult your doctor.

warningsLiver

SAFE IF PRESCRIBED

Afatinib 40mg Tablet is probably safe to use in patients with liver disease. Limited data available suggests that dose adjustment of Afatinib 40mg Tablet may not be needed in these patients. Please consult your doctor.

WHAT IF YOU FORGET TO TAKE AFATINIB TABLET?

If you miss a dose of Afatinib 40mg Tablet, skip it and continue with your normal schedule. Do not double the dose.

Afatinib Dimaleate Film-coated Tablets IP 20mg, 30mg, 40mg, 50mg Taj Pharma

1. NAME OF THE MEDICINAL PRODUCT

a) Afatinib dimaleate film-coated tablets IP 20mg Taj Pharma
b) Afatinib dimaleate film-coated tablets IP 30mg Taj Pharma
c) Afatinib dimaleate film-coated tablets IP 40mg Taj Pharma
d) Afatinib dimaleate film-coated tablets IP 50mg Taj Pharma

2.QUALITATIVE AND QUANTITATIVE COMPOSITION??????????????????????????????

a) Each film-coated tablet contains:
Afatinib (as dimaleate) IP 20mg
Lactose??????????????????????????? 118mg
Excipients? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? q.s.

b) Each film-coated tablet contains:
Afatinib (as dimaleate) IP 30mg
Lactose???????????????????????? ???176mg
Excipients? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? q.s.

c) Each film-coated tablet contains:
Afatinib (as dimaleate) IP 40mg
Lactose??????????????????????????? 235mg
Excipients? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? q.s.

d) Each film-coated tablet contains:
Afatinib (as dimaleate) IP 50mg
Lactose??????????????????????????? 294mg
Excipients? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? q.s.

For the full list of excipients, see section 6.1.

3.PHARMACEUTICAL FORM????

Film-coated tablet (tablet).

Afatinib 20mg film-coated tablets
White to yellowish, round, biconvex and bevel-edged film-coated tablet.

Afatinib 30mg film-coated tablets
Dark blue, round, biconvex and bevel-edged film-coated tablet.

Afatinib 40mg film-coated tablets
Light blue, round, biconvex and bevel-edged film-coated tablet.

Afatinib 50mg film-coated tablets
Dark blue, oval, biconvex film-coated tablet.

4.CLINICAL PARTICULARS

4.1 Therapeutic indications

Afatinib as monotherapy is indicated for the treatment of

  • Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) TKI-na?ve adult patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with activating EGFR mutation(s);
  • Adult patients with locally advanced or metastatic NSCLC of squamous histology progressing on or after platinum-based chemotherapy (see section 5.1).

?4.2 Posology and method of administration

Treatment with Afatinib should be initiated and supervised by a physician experienced in the use of anticancer therapies.

EGFR mutation status should be established prior to initiation of Afatinib therapy (see section 4.4).

Posology

The recommended dose is 40 mg once daily.

This medicinal product should be taken without food. Food should not be consumed for at least 3 hours before and at least 1 hour after taking this medicinal product (see sections 4.5 and 5.2).

Afatinib treatment should be continued until disease progression or until no longer tolerated by the patient (see Table 1 below).

Dose escalation

A dose escalation to a maximum of 50 mg/day may be considered in patients who tolerate a 40 mg/day starting dose (i.e. absence of diarrhoea, skin rash, stomatitis, and other adverse reactions with CTCAE Grade > 1) in the first cycle of treatment (21 days for EGFR mutation positive NSCLC and 28 days for squamous NSCLC). The dose should not be escalated in any patients with a prior dose reduction. The maximum daily dose is 50 mg.

Dose adjustment for adverse reactions

Symptomatic adverse reactions (e.g. severe/persistent diarrhoea or skin related adverse reactions) may be successfully managed by treatment interruption and dose reductions or treatment discontinuation of Afatinib as outlined in Table 1 (see sections 4.4 and 4.8).

Table 1: Dose adjustment information for adverse reactions

CTCAEa?Adverse reactionsRecommended dosing
Grade 1 or Grade 2No interruption?bNo dose adjustment
Grade 2 (prolonged?c?or intolerable) or

Grade ? 3

Interrupt until Grade 0/1?bResume with dose reduction by 10 mg decrements?d

a?NCI Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events

b?In case of diarrhoea, anti-diarrhoeal medicinal products (e.g. loperamide) should be taken immediately and continued for persistent diarrhoea until loose bowel movements cease.

c?> 48 hours of diarrhoea and/or > 7 days of rash

d?If patient cannot tolerate 20 mg/day, permanent discontinuation of Afatinib should be considered

Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD) should be considered if a patient develops acute or worsening of respiratory symptoms in which case treatment should be interrupted pending evaluation. If ILD is diagnosed, Afatinib should be discontinued and appropriate treatment initiated as necessary (see section 4.4).

Missed dose

If a dose is missed, it should be taken within the same day as soon as the patient remembers. However, if the next scheduled dose is due within 8 hours then the missed dose must be skipped.

Use of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) inhibitors

If P-gp inhibitors need to be taken, they should be administered using staggered dosing, i.e. the P-gp inhibitor dose should be taken as far apart in time as possible from the Afatinib dose. This means preferably 6 hours (for P-gp inhibitors dosed twice daily) or 12 hours (for P-gp inhibitors dosed once daily) apart from Afatinib (see section 4.5).

Special populations

Patients with renal impairment

Exposure to afatinib was found to be increased in patients with moderate or severe renal impairment (see section 5.2). Adjustments to the starting dose are not necessary in patients with mild (eGFR 60-89 mL/min/1.73m?), moderate (eGFR 30-59 mL/min/1.73m?) or severe (eGFR 15-29 mL/min/1.73m?) renal impairment. Monitor patients with severe renal impairment (eGFR 15-29 mL/min/1.73m?) and adjust AFATINIB dose if not tolerated.

Afatinib treatment in patients with eGFR <15 mL/min/1.73m? or on dialysis is not recommended.

Patients with hepatic impairment

Exposure to afatinib is not significantly changed in patients with mild (Child Pugh A) or moderate (Child Pugh B) hepatic impairment (see section 5.2). Adjustments to the starting dose are not necessary in patients with mild or moderate hepatic impairment. This medicinal product has not been studied in patients with severe (Child Pugh C) hepatic impairment. Treatment in this population is not recommended (see section 4.4).

Paediatric population

There is no relevant use of Afatinib in the paediatric population in the indication of NSCLC. Therefore, treatment of children or adolescents with this medicinal product is not recommended.

Method of administration

This medicinal product is for oral use. The tablets should be swallowed whole with water. If swallowing of whole tablets is not possible, these can be dispersed in approximately 100 ml of non-carbonated drinking water. No other liquids should be used. The tablet should be dropped into the water without crushing it, and stirred occasionally for up to 15 min until it is broken up into very small particles. The dispersion should be consumed immediately. The glass should be rinsed with approximately 100 ml of water which should also be consumed. The dispersion can also be administered through a gastric tube.

?4.3 Contraindications

Hypersensitivity to afatinib or to any of the excipients listed in section 6.1.

4.4 Special warnings and precautions for use

Assessment of EGFR mutation status

When assessing the EGFR mutation status of a patient, it is important that a well-validated and robust methodology is chosen to avoid false negative or false positive determinations.

Diarrhoea

Diarrhoea, including severe diarrhoea, has been reported during treatment with Afatinib (see section 4.8). Diarrhoea may result in dehydration with or without renal impairment, which in rare cases has resulted in fatal outcomes. Diarrhoea usually occurred within the first 2 weeks of treatment. Grade 3 diarrhoea most frequently occurred within the first 6 weeks of treatment.

Proactive management of diarrhoea including adequate hydration combined with anti-diarrhoeal medicinal products especially within the first 6 weeks of the treatment is important and should start at first signs of diarrhoea. Antidiarrhoeal medicinal products (e.g. loperamide) should be used and if necessary their dose should be escalated to the highest recommended approved dose. Anti-diarrhoeal medicinal products should be readily available to the patients so that treatment can be initiated at first signs of diarrhoea and continued until loose bowel movements cease for 12 hours. Patients with severe diarrhoea may require interruption and dose reduction or discontinuation of therapy with Afatinib (see section 4.2). Patients who become dehydrated may require administration of intravenous electrolytes and fluids.

Skin related adverse events

Rash/acne has been reported in patients treated with this medicinal product (see section 4.8). In general, rash manifests as a mild or moderate erythematous and acneiform rash, which may occur or worsen in areas exposed to sun. For patients who are exposed to sun, protective clothing, and use of sun screen is advisable. Early intervention (such as emollients, antibiotics) of dermatologic reactions can facilitate continuous Afatinib treatment. Patients with severe skin reactions may also require temporary interruption of therapy, dose reduction (see section 4.2), additional therapeutic intervention, and referral to a specialist with expertise in managing these dermatologic effects.

Bullous, blistering and exfoliative skin conditions have been reported including rare cases suggestive of Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis. Treatment with this medicinal product should be interrupted or discontinued if the patient develops severe bullous, blistering or exfoliating conditions (see section 4.8).

Female gender, lower body weight, and underlying renal impairment

Higher exposure to afatinib has been observed in female patients, patients with lower body weight and those with underlying renal impairment (see section 5.2). This could result in a higher risk of developing adverse reactions in particular diarrhoea, rash/acne and stomatitis. Closer monitoring is recommended in patients with these risk factors.

Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD)

There have been reports of ILD or ILD-like adverse reactions (such as lung infiltration, pneumonitis, acute respiratory distress syndrome, allergic alveolitis), including fatalities, in patients receiving Afatinib for treatment of NSCLC. ILD-like adverse reactions were reported in 0.7% of patients treated with Afatinib across all clinical trials (including 0.5% of patients with CTCAE Grade ? 3 ILD-like adverse reactions). Patients with a history of ILD have not been studied.

Careful assessment of all patients with an acute onset and/or unexplained worsening of pulmonary symptoms (dyspnoea, cough, fever) should be performed to exclude ILD. Treatment with this medicinal product should be interrupted pending investigation of these symptoms. If ILD is diagnosed, Afatinib should be permanently discontinued and appropriate treatment initiated as necessary (see section 4.2).

Severe hepatic impairment

Hepatic failure, including fatalities, has been reported during treatment with this medicinal product in less than 1% of patients. In these patients, confounding factors have included pre-existing liver disease and/or comorbidities associated with progression of underlying malignancy. Periodic liver function testing is recommended in patients with pre-existing liver disease. In the pivotal trials Grade 3 alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) elevations were observed in 2.4% (LUX-Lung-3) and 1.6% (LUX-Lung 8) of patients with normal baseline liver tests treated with 40 mg/day. In LUX-Lung-3 Grade 3 ALT/AST elevations were about 3.5 fold higher in patients with abnormal baseline liver tests. There were no Grade 3 ALT/AST elevations in patients with abnormal baseline liver tests in LUX-Lung 8 (see section 4.8). Dose interruption may become necessary in patients who experience worsening of liver function (see section 4.2). In patients who develop severe hepatic impairment while taking Afatinib, treatment should be discontinued.

Gastrointestinal perforations

Gastrointestinal perforation, including fatalities, has been reported during treatment with Afatinib in 0.2% of patients across all randomized controlled clinical trials. In the majority of cases, gastrointestinal perforation was associated with other known risk factors, including concomitant medications such as corticosteroids, NSAIDs, or anti-angiogenic agents, an underlying history of gastrointestinal ulceration, underlying diverticular disease, age, or bowel metastases at sites of perforation. In patients who develop gastrointestinal perforation while taking Afatinib, treatment should be permanently discontinued.

Keratitis

Symptoms such as acute or worsening eye inflammation, lacrimation, light sensitivity, blurred vision, eye pain and/or red eye should be referred promptly to an ophthalmology specialist. If a diagnosis of ulcerative keratitis is confirmed, treatment should be interrupted or discontinued. If keratitis is diagnosed, the benefits and risks of continuing treatment should be carefully considered. This medicinal product should be used with caution in patients with a history of keratitis, ulcerative keratitis or severe dry eye. Contact lens use is also a risk factor for keratitis and ulceration (see section 4.8).

Left ventricular function

Left ventricular dysfunction has been associated with HER2 inhibition. Based on the available clinical trial data, there is no suggestion that this medicinal product causes an adverse reaction on cardiac contractility. However, this medicinal product has not been studied in patients with abnormal left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) or those with significant cardiac history. In patients with cardiac risk factors and those with conditions that can affect LVEF, cardiac monitoring, including an assessment of LVEF at baseline and during treatment, should be considered. In patients who develop relevant cardiac signs/symptoms during treatment, cardiac monitoring including LVEF assessment should be considered.

In patients with an ejection fraction below the institution’s lower limit of normal, cardiac consultation as well as treatment interruption or discontinuation should be considered.

P-glycoprotein (P-gp) interactions

Concomitant treatment with strong inducers of P-gp may decrease exposure to afatinib (see section 4.5).

Lactose

This medicinal product contains lactose. Patients with rare hereditary conditions of galactose intolerance, total lactase deficiency or glucose-galactose malabsorption should not take this medicinal product.

4.5 Interaction with other medicinal products and other forms of interaction

Interactions with drug transport systems

Effects of P-gp and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) inhibitors on afatinib

In vitro?studies have demonstrated that afatinib is a substrate of P-gp and BCRP. When the strong P-gp and BCRP inhibitor ritonavir (200 mg twice a day for 3 days) was administered 1 hour before a single dose of 20 mg AFATINIB, exposure to afatinib increased by 48% (area under the curve (AUC0-?)) and 39% (maximum plasma concentration (Cmax)). In contrast, when ritonavir was administered simultaneously or 6 hours after 40 mg AFATINIB, the relative bioavailability of afatinib was 119% (AUC0-?) and 104% (Cmax) and 111% (AUC0-?) and 105% (Cmax), respectively. Therefore, it is recommended to administer strong P-gp inhibitors (including but not limited to ritonavir, cyclosporine A, ketoconazole, itraconazole, erythromycin, verapamil, quinidine, tacrolimus, nelfinavir, saquinavir, and amiodarone) using staggered dosing, preferably 6 hours or 12 hours apart from AFATINIB (see section 4.2).

Effects of P-gp inducers on afatinib

Pre-treatment with rifampicin (600 mg once daily for 7 days), a potent inducer of P-gp, decreased the plasma exposure to afatinib by 34% (AUC0-?) and 22% (Cmax) after administration of a single dose of 40 mg AFATINIB. Strong P-gp inducers (including but not limited to rifampicin, carbamazepine, phenytoin, phenobarbital or St. John’s wort?(Hypericum perforatum)) may decrease exposure to afatinib (see section 4.4).

Effects of afatinib on P-gp substrates

Based on?in vitro?data, afatinib is a moderate inhibitor of P-gp. However, based on clinical data it is considered unlikely that AFATINIB treatment will result in changes of the plasma concentrations of other P-gp substrates.

Interactions with BCRP

In vitro?studies indicated that afatinib is a substrate and an inhibitor of the transporter BCRP. Afatinib may increase the bioavailability of orally administered BCRP substrates (including but not limited to rosuvastatin and sulfasalazine).

Food effect on afatinib

Co-administration of a high-fat meal with Afatinib resulted in a significant decrease of exposure to afatinib by about 50% in regard to Cmax?and 39% in regard to AUC0-?. This medicinal product should be administered without food (see sections 4.2 and 5.2).

4.6 Fertility, pregnancy and lactation

Women of childbearing potential

As a precautionary measure, women of childbearing potential should be advised to avoid becoming pregnant while receiving treatment with Afatinib. Adequate contraceptive methods should be used during therapy and for at least 1 month after the last dose.

Pregnancy

Mechanistically, all EGFR targeting medicinal products have the potential to cause foetal harm.

Animal studies with afatinib did not indicate direct or indirect harmful effects with respect to reproductive toxicity (see section 5.3). Studies in animals have shown no signs of teratogenicity up to and including maternally lethal dose levels. Adverse changes were restricted to toxic dose levels. However, systemic exposures achieved in animals were either in a similar range or below the levels observed in patients (see section 5.3).

There are no or limited amount of data from the use of this medicinal product in pregnant women. The risk for humans is thus unknown. If used during pregnancy or if the patient becomes pregnant while or after receiving Afatinib, she should be informed of the potential hazard to the foetus.

Breast-feeding

Available pharmacokinetic data in animals have shown excretion of afatinib in milk (see section 5.3). Based on this, it is likely that afatinib is excreted in human milk. A risk to the breast-feeding child cannot be excluded. Mothers should be advised against breast-feeding while receiving this medicinal product.

Fertility

Fertility studies in humans have not been performed with afatinib. Available non-clinical toxicology data have shown effects on reproductive organs at higher doses. Therefore, an adverse effect of this medicinal product on human fertility cannot be excluded.

?4.7 Effects on ability to drive and use machines

Afatinib has minor influence on the ability to drive and use machines. During treatment, ocular adverse reactions (conjunctivitis, dry eye, keratitis) have been reported in some patients (see section 4.8) which may affect patients ability to drive or use machines.

?4.8 Undesirable effects

Summary of the safety profile

The types of adverse reactions (ADRs) were generally associated with the EGFR inhibitory mode of action of afatinib. The summary of all ADRs is shown in Table 2. The most frequent ADRs were diarrhoea and skin related adverse events (see section 4.4) as well as stomatitis and paronychia (see also Table 3, 4 and 5). Overall, dose reduction (see section 4.2) led to a lower frequency of common adverse reactions.

In patients treated with once daily Afatinib 40 mg, dose reductions due to ADRs occurred in 57% of the patients in the LUX-Lung 3 trial and in 25% of the patients in the LUX-Lung 8 trial. Discontinuation due to ADRs diarrhoea and rash/acne was 1.3% and 0% in LUX-Lung 3 and 3.8% and 2.0% in LUX-Lung 8, respectively.

ILD-like adverse reactions were reported in 0.7% of afatinib treated patients. Bullous, blistering and exfoliative skin conditions have been reported including rare cases suggestive of Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis although in these cases there were potential alternative aetiologies (see section 4.4).

Tabulated list of adverse reactions

Table 2 summarises the frequencies of ADRs from all NSCLC trials and from post-marketing experience with daily Afatinib doses of 40 mg or 50 mg as monotherapy. The following terms are used to rank the ADRs by frequency: very common (?1/10); common (?1/100 to <1/10); uncommon (?1/1,000 to <1/100); rare (?1/10,000 to <1/1,000); very rare (<1/10,000). Within each frequency grouping, adverse reactions are presented in order of decreasing seriousness.

Table 2: Summary of ADRs per frequency category

Body SystemVery commonCommonUncommonRare
Infections and infestationsParonychia1Cystitis
Metabolism and nutrition disordersDecreased appetiteDehydration

Hypokalaemia

Nervous system disordersDysgeusia
Eye disordersConjunctivitis

Dry eye

Keratitis
Respiratory, thoracic and mediastinal disordersEpistaxisRhinorrhoeaInterstitial lung disease
Gastrointestinal disordersDiarrhoea

Stomatitis2

Nausea

Vomiting

Dyspepsia

Cheilitis

Pancreatitis

Gastrointestinal perforation

Hepatobiliary disordersAlanine aminotransferase increased

Aspartate aminotransferase increased

Skin and subcutaneous tissue disordersRash3

Dermatitis acneiform4

Pruritus5

Dry skin6

Palmar-plantar erythrodysaesthesia syndrome

Nail disorders8

Stevens-Johnson syndrome7

Toxic epidermal necrolysis7

Musculoskeletal and connective tissue disordersMuscle spasms
Renal and urinary disordersRenal impairment/

Renal failure

General disorders and administration site conditionsPyrexia
InvestigationsWeight decreased

1?Includes Paronychia, Nail infection, Nail bed infection

2?Includes Stomatitis, Aphthous stomatitis, Mucosal inflammation, Mouth ulceration, Oral mucosa erosion, Mucosal erosion, Mucosal ulceration

3?Includes group of rash preferred terms

4?Includes Acne, Acne pustular, Dermatitis acneiform

5?Includes Pruritus, Pruritus generalised

6?Includes Dry skin, Skin chapped

7?Based on post-marketing experience

8?Includes Nail disorder, Onycholysis, Nail toxicity, Onychoclasis, Ingrowing nail, Nail pitting, Onychomadesis, Nail discoloration, Nail dystrophy, Nail ridging, and Onychogryphosis

Description of selected adverse reactions

Very common ADRs in Afatinib -treated patients occurring in at least 10% of patients in trial LUX-Lung 3 and LUX-Lung 7 are summarised by National Cancer Institute-Common Toxicity Criteria (NCI-CTC) Grade in Tables 3 and 4.

Table 3: Very common ADRs in trial LUX-Lung 3

AFATINIB

(40 mg/day)

N=229

Pemetrexed/

Cisplatin

N=111

NCI-CTC GradeAny Grade34Any Grade34
MedDRA Preferred Term%%%%%%
Infections and infestations
Paronychia157.611.40000
Metabolism and nutrition disorders
Decreased appetite20.53.1053.22.70
Respiratory, thoracic and mediastinal disorders
Epistaxis13.1000.90.90
Gastrointestinal disorders
Diarrhoea95.214.4015.300
Stomatitis2

Cheilitis

69.9

12.2

8.3

0

0.4

0

13.5

0.9

0.9

0

0

0

Skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders
Rash370.31406.300
Dermatitis acneiform434.92.60000
Dry skin529.70.401.800
Pruritus619.20.400.900
Investigations
Weight decreased10.5009.000

1?Includes Paronychia, Nail infection, Nail bed infection

2?Includes Stomatitis, Aphthous stomatitis, Mucosal inflammation, Mouth ulceration, Oral mucosa erosion, Mucosal erosion, Mucosal ulceration

3?Includes group of rash preferred terms

4?Includes Acne, Acne pustular, Dermatitis acneiform

5?Includes Dry skin, Skin chapped

6?Includes Pruritus, Pruritus generalised

Table 4: Very common ADRs in trial LUX-Lung 7

AFATINIB

(40 mg/day)

N=160

Gefitinib

 

N=159

NCI-CTC GradeAny Grade34Any Grade34
MedDRA Preferred Term%%%%%%
Infections and infestations
Paronychia157.51.9017.00.60
Cystitis211.31.307.51.30.6
Metabolism and nutrition disorders
Decreased appetite27.51.3024.51.90
Hypokalaemia310.62.51.35.71.30
Respiratory, thoracic and mediastinal disorders
Rhinorrhoea419.4007.500
Epistaxis18.1008.800
Gastrointestinal disorders
Diarrhoea90.613.80.664.23.10
Stomatitis564.44.4027.000
Nausea25.61.3027.71.30
Vomiting19.40.6013.82.50
Dyspepsia10.0008.200
Hepatobiliary disorders
Alanine aminotransferase increased11.30027.78.80.6
Skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders
Rash680.07.5067.93.10
Dry skin32.50039.600
Pruritus725.60025.200
Dermatitis acneiform823.81.9032.10.60
General disorders and administration site conditions
Pyrexia13.8006.300
Investigations
Weight decreased10.00.605.70.60

1?Includes Paronychia, Nail infection, Nail bed infection

2?Includes Cystitis, Urinary tract infection

3?Includes Hypokalaemia, Blood potassium decreased

4?Includes Rhinorrhoea, Nasal inflammation

5?Includes Stomatitis, Aphthous stomatitis, Mucosal inflammation, Mouth ulceration, Mucosal erosion

6?Includes group of rash preferred terms

7?Includes Pruritus, Pruritus generalised

8?Includes Dermatitis acneiform, Acne

Liver function test abnormalities

Liver function test abnormalities (including elevated ALT and AST) were observed in patients receiving Afatinib 40 mg. These elevations were mainly transient and did not lead to discontinuation. Grade 2 (> 2.5 to 5.0 times upper limit of normal (ULN)) ALT elevations occurred in < 8% of patients treated with this medicinal product. Grade 3 (> 5.0 to 20.0 times ULN) elevations occurred in <4% of patients treated with Afatinib (see section 4.4).

Description of selected adverse reactions

Very common ADRs in Afatinib -treated patients occurring in at least 10% of patients in trial LUX-Lung 8 are summarised by National Cancer Institute-Common Toxicity Criteria (NCI-CTC) Grade in Table 5.

Table 5: Very common ADRs in trial LUX-Lung 8*

AFATINIB

(40 mg/day)

N=392

Erlotinib

N=395

NCI-CTC GradeAny Grade34Any Grade34
MedDRA Preferred Term%%%%%%
Infections and infestations
Paronychia111.00.505.10.30
Metabolism and nutrition disorders
Decreased appetite24.73.1026.12.00
Gastrointestinal disorders
Diarrhoea74.79.90.841.33.00.3
Stomatitis2

Nausea

30.1

20.7

4.1

1.5

0

0

10.6

16.2

0.5

1.0

0

0.3

Skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders
Rash360.75.4056.78.10
Dermatitis acneiform414.01.3018.02.50

*?Reporting the frequency of patients with all causality AEs

1?Includes Paronychia, Nail infection, Nail bed infection

2?Includes Stomatitis, Aphthous stomatitis, Mucosal inflammation, Mouth ulceration, Oral mucosa erosion, Mucosal erosion, Mucosal ulceration

3?Includes group of rash preferred terms

4?Includes Acne, Acne pustular, Dermatitis acneiform

Liver function test abnormalities

Liver function test abnormalities (including elevated ALT and AST) were observed in patients receiving Afatinib 40 mg. These elevations were mainly transient and did not lead to discontinuation. Grade 2 ALT elevations occurred in 1% and Grade 3 elevations occurred in 0.8% of patients treated with Afatinib (see section 4.4).

Reporting of suspected adverse reactions

Reporting suspected adverse reactions after authorisation of the medicinal product is important. It allows continued monitoring of the benefit/risk balance of the medicinal product.

?4.9 Overdose

Symptoms

The highest dose of afatinib studied in a limited number of patients in Phase I clinical trials was 160 mg once daily for 3 days and 100 mg once daily for 2 weeks. The adverse reactions observed at these doses were primarily dermatological (rash/acne) and gastrointestinal events (especially diarrhoea). Overdose in 2 healthy adolescents involving the ingestion of 360 mg each of afatinib (as part of a mixed drug ingestion) was associated with adverse events of nausea, vomiting, asthenia, dizziness, headache, abdominal pain and elevated amylase (< 1.5 times ULN). Both individuals recovered from these adverse events.

Treatment

There is no specific antidote for overdose with this medicinal product. In cases of suspected overdose, Afatinib should be withheld and supportive care initiated.

If indicated, elimination of unabsorbed afatinib may be achieved by emesis or gastric lavage.

5.PHARMACOLOGICAL PROPERTIES

5.1 Pharmacodynamic properties

Pharmacotherapeutic group: antineoplastic agents, protein kinase inhibitors.

Mechanism of action

Afatinib is a potent and selective, irreversible ErbB Family Blocker. Afatinib covalently binds to and irreversibly blocks signalling from all homo- and heterodimers formed by the ErbB family members EGFR (ErbB1), HER2 (ErbB2), ErbB3 and ErbB4.

Pharmacodynamic effects

Aberrant ErbB signalling triggered by receptor mutations, and/or amplification, and/or receptor ligand overexpression contributes to the malignant phenotype. Mutation in EGFR defines a distinct molecular subtype of lung cancer.

In non-clinical disease models with ErbB pathway deregulation, afatinib as a single agent effectively blocks ErbB receptor signalling resulting in tumour growth inhibition or tumour regression. NSCLC tumours with common activating EGFR mutations (Del 19, L858R) and several less common EGFR mutations in exon 18 (G719X) and exon 21 (L861Q) are particularly sensitive to afatinib treatment in non-clinical and clinical settings. Limited non-clinical and/or clinical activity was observed in NSCLC tumours with insertion mutations in exon 20.

The acquisition of a secondary T790M mutation is a major mechanism of acquired resistance to afatinib and gene dosage of the T790M-containing allele correlates with the degree of resistance in vitro. The T790M mutation is found in approximately 50% of patients’ tumours upon disease progression on afatinib, for which T790M targeted EGFR TKIs may be considered as a next line treatment option. Other potential mechanisms of resistance to afatinib have been suggested preclinically and MET gene amplification has been observed clinically.

Clinical efficacy and safety

AFATINIB in patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) with EGFR mutations

LUX-Lung 3

In the first-line setting, the efficacy and safety of Afatinib in patients with EGFR mutation-positive locally advanced or metastatic NSCLC (stage IIIB or IV) were assessed in a global, randomised, multicentre, open-label trial. Patients were screened for the presence of 29 different EGFR mutations using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based method (TheraScreen?: EGFR29 Mutation Kit, Qiagen Manchester Ltd). Patients were randomised (2:1) to receive AFATINIB 40 mg once daily or up to 6 cycles of pemetrexed/cisplatin. Among the patients randomised, 65% were female, the median age was 61 years, the baseline ECOG performance status was 0 (39%) or 1 (61%), 26% were Caucasian and 72% were Asian. 89% of patients had common EGFR mutations (Del 19 or L858R).

The primary endpoint was progression free survival (PFS) by independent review; the secondary endpoints included overall survival and objective response rate. At the time of the analysis, 14 Nov 2013, 176 patients (76.5%) in the afatinib arm and 70 patients (60.9%) in the chemotherapy arm experienced an event contributing to the PFS analysis, i.e. disease progression as determined by central independent review or death. The efficacy results are provided in Figure 1, Tables 6 and 7.

LUX-Lung 6

The efficacy and safety of Afatinib in Asian patients with Stage IIIB/IV EGFR mutation-positive locally advanced or metastatic adenocarcinoma of the lung was evaluated in a randomised, multicentre, open-label trial. Similar to LUX-Lung 3, patients with previously untreated NSCLC were screened for EGFR mutations using TheraScreen?: EGFR29 Mutation Kit (Qiagen Manchester Ltd). Among randomized patients, 65% were female, the median age was 58 years and all patients were of Asian ethnicity. Patients with common EGFR mutations accounted for 89% of the study population.

The primary endpoint was PFS as assessed by central independent review; secondary endpoints included OS and ORR.

Both trials demonstrated significant improvement in PFS of EGFR mutation positive patients treated with Afatinib compared to chemotherapy. The efficacy results are summarized in Figure 1 (LUX-Lung 3) and Tables 6 and 7 (LUX-Lung 3 and 6). Table 7 shows outcomes in the subgroups of patients with two common EGFR mutations ? Del 19 and L858R.

Figure 1: Kaplan-Meier curve for PFS by independent review by treatment group in trial LUX-Lung 3 (Overall Population)

Table 6: Efficacy results of Afatinib vs. pemetrexed/cisplatin (LUX-Lung 3) gemcitabine/cisplatin (LUX-Lung 6) (Independent review)

LUX-Lung 3LUX-Lung 6
AFATINIB

(N=230)

Pemetrexed/ Cisplatin

(N=115)

AFATINIB

(N=242)

Gemcitabine/ Cisplatin

(N=122)

Progression-free survival

Months (median)

11.26.911.05.6
Hazard Ratio (HR)

(95%CI)

0.58

(0.43-0.78)

0.28

(0.20-0.39)

p-value10.0002<0.0001
1-year PFS Rate48.1%22.0%46.7%2.1%
Objective Response Rate (CR+PR)2 

56.5%

 

22.6%

 

67.8%

 

23.0%

Odds Ratio (OR)

(95%CI)

4.80

(2.89-8.08)

7.57

(4.52-12.68)

p-value1<0.0001<0.0001
Overall Survival (OS)

Months (median)

28.228.223.123.5
Hazard Ratio (HR)

(95%CI)

0.88

(0.66-1.17)

0.93

(0.72-1.22)

p-value10.38500.6137

1?p-value for PFS/OS based on stratified log-rank test; p-value for Objective Response Rate based on logistic regression

2?CR=complete response; PR=partial response

Table 7: PFS and OS efficacy results of Afatinib vs pemetrexed/cisplatin (LUX-Lung 3) gemcitabine/cisplatin (LUX-Lung 6) in the pre-defined EGFR mutation subgroups Del 19 and L858R (Independent review)

LUX-Lung 3LUX-Lung 6
Del19AFATINIB

(N=112)

Pemetrexed/ Cisplatin

(N=57)

AFATINIB

(N=124)

Gemcitabine/ Cisplatin

(N=62)

Progression-free survival

Months (median)

13.85.613.15.6
Hazard Ratio (HR)

(95%CI)

0.26

(0.17-0.42)

0.20

(0.13-0.33)

p-value1<0.0001<0.0001
Overall Survival (OS)

Months (median)

33.321.131.418.4
Hazard Ratio (HR)

(95%CI)

0.54

(0.36-0.79)

0.64

(0.44-0.94)

p-value10.00150.0229
L858RAFATINIB

(N=91)

Pemetrexed/ Cisplatin

(N=47)

AFATINIB

(N=92)

Gemcitabine/ Cisplatin

(N=46)

Progression-free survival

Months (median)

10.88.19.65.6
Hazard Ratio (HR)

(95%CI)

0.75

(0.48-1.19)

0.31

(0.19-0.52)

p-value10.2191<0.0001
Overall Survival (OS)

Months (median)

27.640.319.624.3
Hazard Ratio (HR)

(95%CI)

1.30

(0.80-2.11)

1.22

(0.81-1.83)

p-value10.29190.3432

1?p-value for PFS/OS based on stratified log-rank test

In the pre-defined subgroup of common mutations (combined Del 19 and L858R) for Afatinib and chemotherapy, the median PFS was 13.6 months vs. 6.9 months (HR 0.48; 95% CI 0.35-0.66; p<0.0001; N=307) in LUX-Lung 3, and 11.0 months vs. 5.6 months (HR 0.24; 95% CI 0.17-0.35; p<0.0001; N=324) in LUX-Lung 6, respectively.

PFS benefit was accompanied by improvement in disease-related symptoms and delayed time to deterioration (see Table 8). Mean scores over time for overall quality of life, global health status and physical, role, cognitive, social and emotional functioning were significantly better for Afatinib.

Table 8: Symptom outcomes for Afatinib vs. chemotherapy in trials LUX-Lung 3 and LUX-Lung 6 (EORTC QLQ-C30 & QLQ-LC13)

LUX-Lung 3
CoughDyspnoeaPain
% of patients improved?a67% vs. 60%;

p=0.2133

65% vs. 50%;

p=0.0078

60% vs. 48%;

p=0.0427

Delay of median time to deterioration (months)?a,b27.0 vs. 8.0

HR 0.60; p=0.0062

10.4 vs. 2.9

HR 0.68; p=0.0129

4.2 vs. 3.1

HR 0.83; p=0.1882

LUX-Lung 6
CoughDyspnoeaPain
% of patients improved?a76% vs. 55%;

p=0.0003

71% vs. 48%;

p<0.0001

65% vs. 47%;

p=0.0017

Delay of median time to deterioration (months)?a,b31.1 vs. 10.3

HR 0.46; p=0.0001

7.7 vs. 1.7

HR 0.53; p<0.0001

6.9 vs. 3.4

HR 0.70; p=0.0220

a?values presented for Afatinib vs. chemotherapy, p-value based on logistic regression

b?p-value for time to deterioration based on stratified log-rank test

LUX-Lung 2

LUX-Lung 2 was a single arm Phase II trial in 129 EGFR TKI-na?ve patients with stage IIIB or IV lung adenocarcinoma with EGFR mutations. Patients were enrolled in the first-line (N=61) or second-line setting (N=68) (i.e. after failure of 1 prior chemotherapy regimen). In 61 patients treated in the first-line setting, confirmed ORR was 65.6% and DCR was 86.9% according to independent review. The median PFS was 12.0 months by independent review. Efficacy was similarly high in the group of patients who had received prior chemotherapy (N=68; ORR 57.4%; median PFS by independent review 8 months). The updated median OS for first- and second-line was 31.7 months and 23.6 months, respectively.

LUX-Lung 7

LUX-Lung 7 is a randomised, global, open label Phase IIb trial investigating the efficacy and safety of Afatinib in patients with locally advanced or metastatic lung adenocarcinoma (stage IIIB or IV) with EGFR mutations in the first-line setting. Patients were screened for the presence of activating EGFR mutations (Del 19 and/or L858R) using the TheraScreen??EGFR RGQ PCR Kit, Qiagen Manchester Ltd. Patients (N=319) were randomised (1:1) to receive AFATINIB??40 mg orally once daily (N=160) or gefitinib 250 mg orally once daily (N=159). Randomisation was stratified according to EGFR mutation status (Del 19; L858R) and presence of brain metastases (yes; no).

Among the patients randomised, 62% were female, the median age was 63 years, 16% of patients had brain metastases, the baseline ECOG performance status was 0 (31%) or 1 (69%), 57% were Asian and 43% were non-Asian. Patients had a tumour sample with an EGFR mutation categorised as either exon 19 deletion (58%) or exon 21 L858R substitutions (42%).

The co-primary endpoints include PFS by independent review and OS. Secondary endpoints include ORR and DCR. Afatinib significantly improved PFS and ORR in EGFR mutation positive patients compared to gefitinib. The efficacy results are summarized in Table 9.

Table 9: Efficacy results of Afatinib vs. gefitinib (LUX-Lung 7) based on primary analysis as of August 2015.

AFATINIB

(N=160)

Gefitinib

(N=159)

Hazard Ratio/

Odds Ratio

(95%CI)

p-value2

Median PFS (months), Overall Trial Population

 

18-months PFS rate

24-months PFS rate

11.0

 

 

27%

18%

10.9

 

 

15%

8%

HR 0.73

(0.57-0.95)

0.0165

Median OS (months)1, Overall Trial Population

 

Alive at 18-months

Alive at 24-months

27.9

 

 

71%

61%

24.5

 

 

67%

51%

HR 0.86

(0.66, 1.12)

0.2580

Objective Response Rate (CR+PR)370%56%OR 1.87

(1.12, 2.99)

0.0083

1OS results based on primary OS analysis as of April 2016 at event rates of 109 (68.1%) and 117 (73.6%) in the Afatinib and gefitinib arms, respectively

2p-value for PFS/OS based on stratified log-rank test; p-value for Objective Response Rate based on stratified logistic regression

3CR=complete response; PR=partial response

The PFS hazard ratio for patients with DEL 19 mutations and L858R mutations was 0.76 (95% CI [0.55, 1.06]; p=0.1071), and 0.71 (95% CI [0.47, 1.06]; p=0.0856) respectively for afatinib vs gefitinib.

Analysis of Afatinib ‘s efficacy in EGFR TKI na?ve patients with tumours harbouring uncommon EGFR Mutations (LUX-Lung 2, -3, and -6)

In three clinical trials of Afatinib with prospective tumour genotyping (Phase 3 trials LUX-Lung 3 and -6, and single arm Phase 2 trial LUX-Lung 2), an analysis was conducted of data from a total of 75 TKI-na?ve patients with advanced (stage IIIb-IV) lung adenocarcinomas harbouring uncommon EGFR mutations, which were defined as all mutations other than Del 19 and L858R mutations. Patients were treated with Afatinib 40 mg (all three trials) or 50 mg (LUX-Lung 2) orally once daily.

In patients with tumours harbouring either G719X (N=18), L861Q (N=16), or S768I substitution mutation (N=8), the confirmed ORR was 72.2%, 56.3%, 75.0%, respectively, and the median duration of response was 13.2 months, 12.9 months and 26.3 months, respectively.

In patients with tumours harbouring exon 20 insertions (N=23) the confirmed ORR was 8.7% and the median duration of response was 7.1 months. In patients with tumours harbouring de-novo T790M mutations (N=14) the confirmed ORR was 14.3% and the median duration of response was 8.3 months.

Afatinib in patients with NSCLC of squamous histology

The efficacy and safety of Afatinib as second-line treatment for patients with advanced NSCLC of squamous histology was investigated in a randomized open-label global Phase III trial LUX-Lung 8. Patients who received at least 4 cycles of platinum-based therapy in the first line setting were subsequently randomized 1:1 to daily Afatinib 40 mg or erlotinib 150 mg until progression. Randomization was stratified by race (Eastern Asian vs non Eastern Asian). The primary endpoint was PFS; OS was the key secondary endpoint. Other secondary endpoints included ORR, DCR, change in tumour size and HRQOL.

Among 795 patients randomized, the majority were males (84%), white (73%), current or former smokers (95%) with baseline performance status ECOG 1 (67%) and ECOG 0 (33%).

Second-line AFATINIB significantly improved PFS and OS of patients with squamous NSCLC compared to erlotinib. The efficacy results at the time of the primary analysis of OS including all randomized patients are summarized in Figure 2 and Table 10.

Table 10: Efficacy results for Afatinib vs erlotinib in LUX-Lung 8, based on primary analysis of OS, including all randomized patients

AFATINIB

 

(N=398)

Erlotinib

 

(n=397)

Hazard Ratio/

Odds Ratio

(95%CI)

p-value2
PFS

Months (median)

 

2.63

 

1.94

 

HR 0.81

(0.69, 0.96)

 

0.0103

OS

Months (median)

 

Alive at 12 months

Alive at 18 months

 

7.92

 

36.4%

22.0%

 

6.77

 

28.2%

14.4%

 

HR 0.81

(0.69, 0.95)

 

0.0077

Objective Response Rate (CR+PR)15.5%2.8%OR 2.06

(0.98, 4.32)

0.0551
Duration of response Months (median)7.293.71

1CR=complete response; PR=partial response

2p-value for PFS/OS based on stratified log-rank test; p-value for Objective Response Rate based on logistic regression

The overall survival hazard ratio in patients < 65 years of age was 0.68 (95% CI 0.55, 0.85) and in patients 65 years of age and older it was 0.95 (95% CI 0.76, 1.19).

Figure 2: Kaplan-Meier Curve for OS by treatment group in LUX Lung 8

PFS benefit was accompanied by improvement in disease-related symptoms and delayed time to deterioration (see Table 11).

Table 11: Symptom outcomes for Afatinib vs. erlotinib in trial LUX-Lung 8 (EORTC QLQ-C30 & QLQ-LC13)

CoughDyspnoeaPain
% of patients improveda, c43% vs. 35%;

p=0.0294

51% vs. 44%;

p=0.0605

40% vs. 39%;

p=0.7752

Delay of time to deterioration (months)b, c4.5 vs. 3.7

HR 0.89; p=0.2562

2.6 vs. 1.9

HR 0.79; p=0.0078

2.5 vs. 2.4

HR 0.99; p=0.8690

a?values presented for Afatinib vs. erlotinib, p-value based on logistic regression

b?p-value for time to deterioration based on stratified log-rank test

c?p-values were not adjusted for multiplicity

Efficacy in EGFR-negative tumours has not been established.

Paediatric population

The European Medicines Agency has waived the obligation to submit the results of trials with this medicinal product in all subsets of the paediatric population in NSCLC indications (see section 4.2 for information on paediatric use).

?5.2 Pharmacokinetic properties

Absorption

Following oral administration of Afatinib, Cmax?of afatinib were observed approximately 2 to 5 hours post dose. Cmax?and AUC0-??values increased slightly more than proportionally in the dose range from 20 mg to 50 mg Afatinib. Systemic exposure to afatinib is decreased by 50% (Cmax) and 39% (AUC0-?), when administered with a high-fat meal compared to administration in the fasted state. Based on population pharmacokinetic data derived from clinical trials in various tumour types, an average decrease of 26% in AUC,ss?was observed when food was consumed within 3 hours before or 1 hour after taking AFATINIB. Therefore, food should not be consumed for at least 3 hours before and at least 1 hour after taking AFATINIB (see sections 4.2 and 4.5).

Distribution

In vitro?binding of afatinib to human plasma proteins is approximately 95%. Afatinib binds to proteins both non-covalently (traditional protein binding) and covalently.

Biotransformation

Enzyme-catalyzed metabolic reactions play a negligible role for afatinib?in vivo. Covalent adducts to proteins were the major circulating metabolites of afatinib.

Elimination

In humans, excretion of afatinib is primarily via the faeces. Following administration of an oral solution of 15 mg afatinib, 85.4% of the dose was recovered in the faeces and 4.3% in urine. The parent compound afatinib accounted for 88% of the recovered dose. Afatinib is eliminated with an effective half-life of approximately 37 hours. Thus, steady state plasma concentrations of afatinib were achieved within 8 days of multiple dosing of afatinib resulting in an accumulation of 2.77-fold (AUC0-?) and 2.11-fold (Cmax). In patients treated with afatinib for more than 6 months a terminal half-life of 344 h was estimated.

Special populations

Renal impairment

Less than 5% of a single dose of afatinib is excreted via the kidneys. Exposure to afatinib in subjects with renal impairment was compared to healthy volunteers following a single dose of 40 mg Afatinib. Subjects with moderate renal impairment (n=8; eGFR 30-59 mL/min/1.73m?, according to the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease [MDRD] formula) had an exposure of 101% (Cmax) and 122% (AUC0-tz) in comparison to their healthy controls. Subjects with severe renal impairment (n=8; eGFR 15-29 mL/min/1.73m?, according to the MDRD formula) had an exposure of 122% (Cmax) and 150% (AUC0-tz) in comparison to their healthy controls. Based on this trial and population pharmacokinetic analysis of data derived from clinical trials in various tumour types, it is concluded, that adjustments to the starting dose in patients with mild (eGFR 60-89 mL/min/1.73m?), moderate (eGFR 30-59 mL/min/1.73m?), or severe (eGFR 15-29 mL/min/1.73m?) renal impairment are not necessary, but patients with severe impairment should be monitored (see ?Population pharmacokinetic analysis in special populations? below and section 4.2). Afatinib has not been studied in patients with eGFR <15 mL/min/1.73m? or on dialysis.

Hepatic impairment

Afatinib is eliminated mainly by biliary/faecal excretion. Subjects with mild (Child Pugh A) or moderate (Child Pugh B) hepatic impairment had similar exposure in comparison to healthy volunteers following a single dose of 50 mg Afatinib. This is consistent with population pharmacokinetic data derived from clinical trials in various tumour types (see ?Population pharmacokinetic analysis in special populations? below). No starting dose adjustments appear necessary in patients with mild or moderate hepatic impairment (see section 4.2). The pharmacokinetics of afatinib have not been studied in subjects with severe (Child Pugh C) hepatic dysfunction (see section 4.4).

Population pharmacokinetic analysis in special populations

A population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed in 927 cancer patients (764 with NSCLC) receiving Afatinib monotherapy. No starting dose adjustment was considered necessary for any of the following covariates tested.

Age

No significant impact of age (range: 28 years – 87 years) on the pharmacokinetics of afatinib could be observed.

Body weight

Plasma exposure (AUC,ss) was increased by 26% for a 42 kg patient (2.5th?percentile) and decreased by 22% for a 95 kg patient (97.5th?percentile) relative to a patient weighing 62 kg (median body weight of patients in the overall patient population).

Gender

Female patients had a 15% higher plasma exposure (AUC,ss, body weight corrected) than male patients.

Race

Race had no effect on the pharmacokinetics of afatinib based on a population pharmacokinetic analysis, including patients of Asian, White, and Black racial groups. Data on Black racial groups was limited.

Renal impairment

Exposure to afatinib moderately increased with lowering of the creatinine clearance (CrCL, calculated according to Cockcroft Gault), i.e. for a patient with a CrCL of 60 mL/min or 30 mL/min exposure (AUC,ss) to afatinib increased by 13% and 42%, respectively, and decreased by 6% and 20% for a patient with CrCL of 90 mL/min or 120 mL/min, respectively, compared to a patient with the CrCL of 79 mL/min (median CrCL of patients in the overall patient population analysed).

Hepatic impairment

Patients with mild and moderate hepatic impairment as identified by abnormal liver tests did not correlate with any significant change in afatinib exposure. There was limited data available for moderate and severe hepatic impairment.

Other patient characteristics/intrinsic factors

Other patient characteristics/intrinsic factors found with a significant impact on afatinib exposure were: ECOG performance score, lactate dehydrogenase levels, alkaline phosphatase levels and total protein. The individual effect sizes of these covariates were considered not clinically relevant. Smoking history, alcohol consumption (limited data), or presence of liver metastases had no significant impact on the pharmacokinetics of afatinib.

Other information on drug-drug interactions

Interactions with drug uptake transport systems

In vitro?data indicated that drug-drug interactions with afatinib due to inhibition of OATB1B1, OATP1B3, OATP2B1, OAT1, OAT3, OCT1, OCT2, and OCT3 transporters are considered unlikely.

Interactions with Cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes

In humans it was found that enzyme-catalyzed metabolic reactions play a negligible role for the metabolism of afatinib. Approximately 2% of the afatinib dose was metabolized by FMO3 and the CYP3A4-dependent N-demethylation was too low to be quantitatively detected. Afatinib is not an inhibitor or an inducer of CYP enzymes. Therefore, this medicinal product is unlikely to interact with other medicines that modulate or are metabolised by CYP enzymes.

Effect of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) inhibition on afatinib

In vitro?data indicated that drug-drug interactions with afatinib due to inhibition of UGT1A1 are considered unlikely.

?5.3 Preclinical safety data

Oral administration of single doses to mice and rats indicated a low acute toxic potential of afatinib. In oral repeated-dose studies for up to 26 weeks in rats or 52 weeks in minipigs the main effects were identified in the skin (dermal changes, epithelial atrophy and folliculitis in rats), the gastrointestinal tract (diarrhoea, erosions in the stomach, epithelial atrophy in rats and minipigs) and the kidneys (papillary necrosis in rats). Depending on the finding, these changes occurred at exposures below, in the range of or above clinically relevant levels. Additionally, in various organs pharmacodynamically mediated atrophy of epithelia was observed in both species.

Reproduction toxicity

Based on the mechanism of action, all EGFR targeting medicinal products including Afatinib have the potential to cause foetal harm. The embryo-foetal development studies performed on afatinib revealed no indication of teratogenicity. The respective total systemic exposure (AUC) was either slightly above (2.2 times in rats) or below (0.3 times in rabbits) compared with levels in patients.

Radiolabelled afatinib administered orally to rats on Day 11 of lactation was excreted in the breast milk of the dams.

A fertility study in male and female rats up to the maximum tolerated dose revealed no significant impact on fertility. The total systemic exposure (AUC0-24) in male and female rats was in the range or less than that observed in patients (1.3 times and 0.51 times, respectively).

A study in rats up to the maximum tolerated doses revealed no significant impact on pre-/postnatal development. The highest total systemic exposure (AUC0-24) in female rats was less than that observed in patients (0.23 times).

Phototoxicity

An?in vitro?3T3 test showed that afatinib may have phototoxicity potential.

Carcinogenicity

Carcinogenicity studies have not been conducted with Afatinib.

?6.PHARMACEUTICAL PARTICULARS

6.1 List of excipients

Tablet core
Lactose monohydrate
Cellulose, microcrystalline
Silica, colloidal anhydrous
Crospovidone
Magnesium stearate

Film-coating

Afatinib 20 mg film-coated tablets

Hypromellose
Macrogol 400
Titanium dioxide
Talc
Polysorbate 80

Afatinib 30, 40 and 50 mg film-coated tablets

Hypromellose
Macrogol 400
Titanium dioxide
Talc
Polysorbate 80
Indigo carmine aluminium lake

6.2 Incompatibilities

Not applicable.

6.3 Shelf life

3 years.

6.4 Special precautions for storage

Store in the original package in order to protect from moisture and light.

?6.5 Nature and contents of container

PVC/PVDC perforated unit dose blister. Each blister is packed together with a desiccant sachet in a laminated aluminium pouch and contains 7 x 1 film-coated tablets. Pack sizes of 7 x 1, 14 x 1 or 28 x 1 film-coated tablets.

Not all pack sizes may be marketed.

6.6 Special precautions for disposal and other handling

Any unused medicinal product or waste material should be disposed of in accordance with local requirements.

7. Manufactured in India By:
TAJ PHARMACEUTICALS LIMITED
Mumbai, India
Survey No.188/1 to 189/1,190/1 to 4,
Athiyawad, Dabhel,
Daman- 396210 (INDIA)

Afatinib Dimaleate Film-coated Tablets IP 20mg, 30mg, 40mg, 50mg Taj Pharma
Package leaflet: Information for the patient

Afatinib

Read all of this leaflet carefully before you start taking this medicine because it contains important information for you.

  • Keep this leaflet. You may need to read itagain.
  • If you have any further questions, ask your doctor orpharmacist.
  • This medicine has been prescribed for you only. Do not pass it on to others. It may harmthem, even if their signs of illness are the same asyours.
  • If you get any side effects, talk to your doctor or pharmacist. This includes any possible side effects not listed in this leaflet. See section4.

What is in this leaflet:

  1. What Afatinib is and what it is used for
  2. What you need to know before you take Afatinib
  3. How to take Afatinib
  4. Possible side effects
  5. How to store Afatinib
  6. Contents of the pack and other information
1 WHAT AFATINIB IS AND WHAT IT IS USED FOR

Afatinib is a medicine which contains the active substance afatinib. It works by blocking the activity of a group of proteins called the ErbB family (including EGFR [epidermal growth factor receptor or ErbB1], HER2 [ErbB2], ErbB3 and ErbB4). These proteins are involved in the growth and spread of cancer cells, and can be affected by changes (mutations) in the genes that produce them. By blocking the activity of these proteins this medicine can inhibit growth and spread of cancer cells.

This medicine is used on its own to treat adult patients with a specific type of cancer of the lung (non-small cell lung cancer):
? that is identified by a change (mutation) in the gene for EGFR. Afatinib can be prescribed to you as your first treatment or if prior chemotherapy treatment has been insufficient.
? of squamous type if prior chemotherapy treatment has been insufficient.

2 WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW BEFORE YOU TAKE AFATINIB

Do not take Afatinib
– if you are allergic to afatinib or any of the other ingredients of this medicine (listed in section 6).

Warnings and precautions
Talk to your doctor or pharmacist before taking this medicine:
? if you are female, have a low body weight of less than 50 kg or have kidney problems. If any of these apply to you, your doctor may monitor you more closely as the side effects may be more pronounced.
? if you have a history of lung inflammation (interstitial lung disease).
? if you have liver problems. Your doctor may do some liver tests. Treatment with this medicine is not recommended if you have a severe liver disease.
? if you have a history of eye problems such as severe dry eyes, inflammation of the transparent layer at the front of the eye (cornea) or ulcers involving the outer part of the eye, or if you use contact lenses.
? if you have a history of heart problems. Your doctor may want to monitor you more closely.

Inform your doctor immediately while taking this medicine:
? if you develop diarrhoea. Treatment at the first signs of diarrhoea is important.
? if you develop skin rash. Early treatment of skin rash is important.
? if you develop new or sudden worsening of shortness of breath, possibly with a cough or fever. These could be symptoms of an inflammation of the lungs (interstitial lung disease) and can be lifethreatening.
? if you have severe pain in your stomach or intestines, fever, chills, sickness, vomiting, or abdominal rigidity or bloating, as these could be symptoms of a tear in the wall of your stomach or intestines (?gastrointestinal perforation?). Also, tell your doctor if you had gastrointestinal ulcers or diverticular disease in the past, or are concomitantly treated with anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (used to treat pain relief and swelling) or steroids (used for inflammation and allergies), as this may increase this risk.
? if you develop acute or worsening redness and pain in the eye, increased eye watering, blurred vision and/or sensitivity to light. You may need urgent treatment.

See also section 4 ?Possible side effects?.

Children and adolescents
Afatinib has not been studied in children or adolescents. Do not give this medicine to children or adolescents under the age of 18 years.

Other medicines and Afatinib
Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking, have recently taken or might take any other medicines, including herbal medicines and medicines obtained without a prescription.

In particular, if taken before Afatinib, the following medicines may increase the blood levels of Afatinib and therefore the risk of side effects. They should therefore be taken as far apart in time as possible from Afatinib. This means preferably 6 hours (for medicines taken twice daily) or 12 hours (for medicines taken once daily) apart from Afatinib:
? Ritonavir, ketoconazole (except in shampoo), itraconazole, erythromycin, nelfinavir, saquinavir – used to treat different kinds of infections.
? Verapamil, quinidine, amiodarone – used to treat heart conditions.
? Cyclosporine A, tacrolimus – medicines that affect your immune system.

The following medicines may reduce the effectiveness of AFATINIB:
? Carbamazepine, phenytoin, phenobarbital – used to treat seizures.
? St. John?s wort (Hypericum perforatum), a herbal medicine to treat depression.
? Rifampicin, an antibiotic used to treat tuberculosis.

Ask your doctor if you are unsure of when to take these medicines.

Afatinib may increase the blood levels of other medicines including but not limited to:
? Sulfasalazine, used to treat inflammation/infection.
?? Rosuvastatin, used for lowering cholesterol.

Tell your doctor before taking these medicines together with Afatinib.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding
If you are pregnant or breast-feeding, think you may be pregnant or are planning to have a baby, ask your doctor or pharmacist for advice before taking this medicine.

Pregnancy
You should avoid becoming pregnant while taking this medicine. If you could become pregnant, you should use adequate birth control methods during treatment and for at least 1 month after taking the last dose of this medicine. This is because there may be a risk that an unborn baby is harmed.

If you become pregnant while receiving this medicine, you should immediately inform your doctor. Your doctor will decide with you whether treatment should be continued or not.

If you plan to become pregnant after taking the last dose of this medicine, you should ask your doctor for advice as your body may not have fully eliminated this medicine.

Breast-feeding
Do not breast-feed while taking this medicine as a risk to the breast-fed child cannot be excluded.

Driving and using machines
If you experience treatment-related symptoms affecting your eye sight (e.g. redness and/or irritation of the eye, dry eye, tearing, light-sensitivity) or your ability to concentrate and react, it is recommended that you do not drive or use machines until the side effect disappears (see section 4 Possible side effects).

Afatinib contains lactose
This medicine contains a sugar called lactose. If you have been told by your doctor that you have an intolerance to some sugars, contact your doctor before taking this medicine.

3 HOW TO TAKE AFATINIB

Always take this medicine exactly as your doctor has told you. Check with your doctor or pharmacist if you are not sure.

Dosage
The recommended dose is 40 mg each day.

Your doctor may adjust (increase or decrease) your dose depending on how well you tolerate this medicine.

When to take Afatinib
? It is important to take this medicine without food
? Take this medicine at least 1 hour before eating, or
? If you have already eaten, wait at least 3 hours before taking this medicine.
? Take this medicine once daily about the same time each day. This makes it easier to remember to take this medicine.
? Do not break, chew or crush the tablet.
? Swallow the tablet whole with a glass of still water.

Afatinib is to be taken by mouth. If you have difficulties swallowing the tablet, dissolve it in a glass of still water. No other liquids should be used. Drop the tablet into the water without crushing it, and occasionally stir for up to 15 min until the tablet is broken up into very small particles. Drink the liquid straight away. Then fill the glass again with water and drink it to make sure all medicine is taken.

If you are not able to swallow and have a gastric tube your doctor might suggest that the medicine is given to you via the tube.

If you take more Afatinib than you should
Contact your doctor or pharmacist immediately. You may experience increased side effects and your doctor may interrupt your treatment and provide supportive care.

If you forget to take Afatinib
? If your next scheduled dose is more than 8 hours away, take the missed dose as soon as you remember.
? If your next scheduled dose is due within 8 hours, skip the missed dose and take your next dose at the usual time. Then carry on taking your tablets at regular times as usual.

Do not take a double dose (two tablets instead of one at the same time) to make up for a missed dose.

If you stop taking Afatinib
Do not stop taking this medicine without first consulting your doctor. It is important to take this medicine every day, as long as your doctor prescribes it for you. If you do not take this medicine as prescribed by your doctor your cancer may grow again.

If you have any further questions on the use of this medicine, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

4 POSSIBLE SIDE EFFECTS

Like all medicines, Afatinib can cause side effects, although not everybody gets them.

Contact your doctor as soon as possible if you suffer from any of the serious side effects listed below. In some cases your doctor may need to interrupt treatment and reduce your dose or stop treatment:
? Diarrhoea (very common, may affect more than 1 in 10 people).
Diarrhoea lasting more than 2 days or more severe diarrhoea may lead to fluid loss (common, may affect up to 1 in 10 people), low blood potassium (common) and worsening kidney function (common). Diarrhoea can be treated. At the first signs of diarrhoea drink plenty of fluids. Contact your doctor immediately and start appropriate antidiarrhoeal treatment as soon as possible. You should have antidiarrhoeal medicine available prior to taking Afatinib.

  • Skin rash (very common).
    It is important to treat the rash early. Tell your doctor if a rash starts. If treatment for rash is not working and the rash is getting more severe (for example, you have peeling or blistering of the skin) you should notify your doctor immediately, since your doctor may decide to stop your treatment with Afatinib. Rash may occur or worsen in areas exposed to sun. Sun protection with protective clothing and sunscreen is recommended.
  • Inflammation of the lungs (uncommon, may affect up to 1 in 100 people) called ?interstitial lung disease?.

Tell your doctor immediately if you develop new or sudden worsening of shortness of breath, possibly with a cough or fever.

  • Eye irritation or inflammation
    Eye irritation or inflammation may occur (conjunctivitis/keratoconjunctivitis occurs commonly and keratitis uncommonly). Tell your doctor if you have sudden or worsening of eye symptoms such as pain or redness or dry eye.

If you experience any of the symptoms above, contact your doctor as soon as possible.

The following other side effects have also been reported:

Very common side effects (may affect more than 1 in 10 people):
? Mouth sores and inflammation
? Nail infection
? Decreased appetite
? Bleeding from the nose
? Nausea
? Vomiting
? Itching
? Dry skin

Common side effects (may affect up to 1 in 10 people):
? Pain, redness, swelling or peeling of the skin of your hands and feet
? Increased levels of the liver enzymes (aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase) in blood tests.
? Inflammation of the lining of the bladder with burning sensations during urination and frequent, urgent need to urinate (cystitis)
? Abnormal taste sensations (dysgeusia)
? Stomach pain, indigestion, heartburn
? Lip inflammation
? Decreased weight
? Runny nose
? Muscle spasms
? Fever
? Nail problems

Uncommon side effects (may affect up to 1 in 100 people):
? Inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis)
? Occurrence of a tear in the wall of your stomach or intestines (gastrointestinal perforation)

Rare side effects (may affect up to 1 in 1,000 people):
? Severe blistering or peeling of skin (suggestive of Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis)

Reporting of side effects
If you get any side effects, talk to your doctor or pharmacist. By reporting side effects you can help provide more information on the safety of this medicine.

5 HOW TO STORE AFATINIB

Keep this medicine out of the sight and reach of children.

Do not use this medicine after the expiry date which is stated on the carton, the pouch and the blister after EXP. The expiry date refers to the last day of that month.

Store in the original package in order to protect from moisture and light.

Do not throw away any medicines via wastewater or household waste. Ask your pharmacist how to throw away medicines you no longer use. These measures will help protect the environment.

6 CONTENTS OF THE PACK AND OTHER INFORMATION

What Afatinib contains
– The active substance is afatinib.

a) Each film-coated tablet contains:
Afatinib (as dimaleate) IP 20mg
Lactose??????????????????????????? 118mg
Excipients? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? q.s.

b) Each film-coated tablet contains:
Afatinib (as dimaleate) IP 30mg
Lactose??????????????????????????? 176mg
Excipients? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? q.s.

c) Each film-coated tablet contains:
Afatinib (as dimaleate) IP 40mg
Lactose?????????? ?????????????????235mg
Excipients? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? q.s.

d) Each film-coated tablet contains:
Afatinib (as dimaleate) IP 50mg
Lactose??????????????????????????? 294mg
Excipients? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? q.s.
– The other ingredients are lactose monohydrate, microcrystalline cellulose, colloidal anhydrous silica, crospovidone type A, magnesium stearate, hypromellose, macrogol, titanium dioxide, talc, polysorbate 80.

Contents of the pack

Afatinib 20 mg film-coated tablets are white to yellowish and round shaped. Afatinib film-coated tablets are available in packs containing 1, 2 or 4 perforated unit dose blisters.

Each blister contains 7 x 1 film-coated tablets and is packed in an aluminium pouch together with a desiccant sachet that should not be swallowed.

Not all pack sizes may be marketed.

7. Manufactured in India By:
TAJ PHARMACEUTICALS LIMITED
Mumbai, India
at SURVEY NO. 188/1, 190/1TO 4, ATHIYAWAD , DABHEL,
DAMAN- 396210 (INDIA)

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